The Latest: No jail for man in Dead Sea Scrolls caseApril 16, 2018 2:58pm

NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on a New York man's conviction in a debate over the Dead Sea Scrolls (all times local):

10:45 a.m.

A New York man convicted of using online aliases to discredit his father's detractors in a debate over the Dead Sea Scrolls won't go to jail in the unusual case.

Raphael Golb was re-sentenced Monday to three years' probation. He'd previously faced two months in jail, but appeals had put his sentence on hold and narrowed the counts in his criminal impersonation and forgery conviction.

Manhattan state Supreme Court Justice Laura Ward said Monday Golb had been punished enough.

The nine-year-old case prompted New York state's highest court in 2014 to strike down an aggravated harassment law as unconstitutionally vague. Lawmakers later passed a revised version.

Golb says he's relieved not to be jailed but remains concerned about having been prosecuted for online activity he says was meant as satire.

___

10:45 p.m.

The unusual case of a New York man convicted of using online aliases to discredit his father's detractors in a debate over the Dead Sea Scrolls is coming to an end after nine years.

A Manhattan judge is expected to decide Monday on Raphael Golb's final bid to reduce his two-month jail sentence. It was imposed in 2014, but appeals put it on hold and narrowed the counts in his criminal impersonation and forgery conviction.

Golb was convicted in 2010, but appeals cut a twist-filled path through state and federal courts.

The case also prompted New York state's highest court in 2014 to strike down an aggravated harassment law. The court said it was unconstitutionally vague. Lawmakers later passed a revised version.

Golb is now hoping for a no-jail sentence.

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